Archive for the Poetry Category

Autumn on the Move in NYC

Posted in Aesthetic Realism, American History, Art, Autumn, Beauty, Birds, Fall, New York, New York Landmarks, Parks, Photography, Poetry, Wildlife with tags , , , , , , , on November 10, 2015 by maine1nyc

My wife, Carol Driscoll, and I wanted to honor the waning Fall season by discovering a place which we have never been before, Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx, one of the most picturesque and beautiful areas in NYC. And are we glad we did! There are areas in this park where you can get a sense of what it must have felt like in NY hundreds of years ago. It has a rich history, and is a must visit, or I should say many visits, for a landscape photographer.

pigeon on rock 3ret copy

It is an area that many winged beings like to visit. We didn’t see any unusual fliers this day, but were favorited by a being that is much taken for granted, including by myself, in NY—the pigeon. However, I was affected by this photo that Carol took, that had me reconsider. I’m also including a poem by Ellen Reiss, Aesthetic Realism Chairman of Education, which can have all of us value this most overlooked bird in a new and surprising way.

New York Pigeons
By Ellen Reiss

New York City pigeons are bold.
They peruse the ledgers of dead economies.
They give me critical looks.

4T8A3555-Edit

 

Finally—It’s Here!

Posted in Aesthetic Realism, Beauty, Landscape, New York, Photography, Poetry, Spring with tags , , , , , on May 3, 2015 by maine1nyc

4T8A1012-Edit

 

A favorite poem of mine by Eli Siegel. Spring is really happening this year at last.

Come, Spring Flowers

Though the whole world will work to make you to,
I say, Come, spring flowers.

 From  Hail, American Development (Definition Press) © 1968 by Eli Siegel

4T8A0939-Edit-2

4T8A0992-Edit

Greek Independence Day Parade, or Pride Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow

Posted in Aesthetic Realism, Art, Beauty, Ethics, Greece, Independence Day, Parades, Photography, Poetry with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2015 by maine1nyc

Every year I look forward to photographing this wonderful event, and every time I’m taken by it as if for the first time. Like so many others, I love Greece’s history and how from ancient times through the present, it has added centrally to our lives and to the culture of the whole world. Its meaning is very large, including how its people met challenge after challenge, finally winning a hard fought independence from the Ottoman Turks in 1821.

4T8A0592-Edit

 (Click photos to enlarge.)

4T8A0641-Edit

I was particularly affected by the expressions of the people around me as they showed great pride, not hubris, including in their gestures, as they marched up Fifth Avenue, or watched from the sidelines. I was taken by the array of costumes that spanned many centuries of Greek history and how proudly the people wore them. I hope what I witnessed this day encourages the people of Greece to meet what they are enduring today, with the kind of persistence for justice that they have shown. It will encourage all of us. I quote a poem, along with its note, by the esteemed poet and historian Eli Siegel which stirs me greatly. The poem, a translation of Simonides (556—468 BC), is an honoring of those who fell at the battle of Thermopylae (480 BC).

4T8A0668-Edit

At Thermopylae, By Simonides of Ceos
                           Translation by Eli Siegel

O stranger, tell the Lacedaemonians
That we lie here, true to their laws.

From THE POEMS LOOKED AT: or, NOTES: At Thermopylae, By Simonides of Ceos. 1967. The two lines of Simonides of Ceos, translated here, have been translated often. I felt that free verse, casual and falling carefully, might do something useful with the Greek. There is a high, sharp sadness in “O stranger,” followed by an inevitable request in the Greek; and this I aim for, in the first line. In the second line there is the lasting submission of “That we lie here,” followed by the large pride of “true to their laws.” Government and pathos merge delicately and mightily in the second line. And as the Lacedaemonians are told, the telling goes on to and for everyone—for the  everyone of now, the person of now. Simonides shows us this is how he saw it; this is how, as poet, he desired it.

From Hail, American Development (Definition Press)
© 1968 by Eli Siegel

To see more photos click here.

Autumn In Phoenicia, New York

Posted in Aesthetic Realism, Autumn, Beauty, Fall, Landscape, Photography, Poetry, Rivers on October 21, 2014 by maine1nyc

New York State is a very special place for me to take in the magnificence of this time of year. Here along the Esopus Creek in Phoenicia, I was swept by the beauty, drama and mystery that was all around.  To see more of my visual journey click here.

Here too is a poem I care for by Eli Siegel that expresses a deep reverence and excitement about autumn that I believe can add to the large emotion people have in this beautiful season.

_P1C6078-Edit

(Click photo to make larger.)
Autumn Is Our Friend Poem ES

%d bloggers like this: